Vancouver/Fraser Valley – APRIL 19 UPDATE – Back in march, the BC SPCA and BC Wildlife Rescue asked that bird feeders be taken down as salmonella was causing the deaths of a number of back year birds. That restriction has been lifted with a caution.

Dr. Andrea Wallace, the BC SCPA Wild Animal Welfare Manager emailed FVN and chillTV: The BC SPCA’s Wild Animal Rehabilitation Centre in Victoria has observed a decrease in the number of birds admitted showing clinical signs of Salmonella in the last couple of weeks, which is promising. Salmonella is a common bacteria in the natural environment, which can lead to opportunistic infection and outbreaks primarily during the winter months. During a known outbreak like we’ve observed this year, our advice, which is consistent with the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative, has been to remove bird feeders and baths until warmer spring weather to reduce the likelihood of transmission. Visible cases will continue to decline as the population of pine siskins declines and as birds disperse. Warmer weather and increased natural food availability will also help to reduce susceptibility and exposure. If it is warm and there is no evidence of sick birds in an area, it is ok to put feeders back up. Feeders should be well-maintained to prevent disease transmission.

MARCH 2 UPDATE: Salmonella outbreak continues, BC SPCA asks public to remove bird feeders until warmer weather in April-May.

Wildlife rehabilitation centres in the Lower Mainland are seeing another increase in pine siskins admitted due to Salmonella – most of them admitted in the last week. Wild ARC in Victoria continues to admit smaller numbers of pine siskins, as well as a few finches with conjunctivitis – another illness commonly spread by gatherings at bird feeders. Reports of sick birds have also been received from the interior, including Penticton and Kelowna.

The BC SPCA is asking the public to keep their bird feeders down until April-May to help stop the spread of this deadly outbreak.

Hummingbird feeders are not at risk at this point in time, but this is a good reminder to regularly change and clean hummingbird feeders to prevent deadly fungal outbreaks. Learn how and when to change the nectar solution, and how to clean your feeder to keep these beautiful birds healthy and safe.

FEBRUARY 3 UPDATE – In January, the BC SPCA joined the Wildlife Rescue Association of BC in their posted call to social media that they have seen increased reports of sick and dying birds noticed across the Pacific Northwest, from Oregon to British Columbia.Wildlife Rescue is seeing record-breaking numbers of birds displaying symptoms of Salmonella infection.

Wildlife Rescue has told FVN that the call for bird feeders to remain down has been extended through February and they reassess the situation in early March. Both organizations continue to receive calls of sick birds from salmonella and bird feeders are one of the main root causes.

You are asked to keep bird feeders down, clean and possibly bleached and hopefully the concert will pass by March

JANUARY 26 STORY – The BC SPCA joins the Wildlife Rescue Association of BC in their posted call to social media that they have seen increased reports of sick and dying birds noticed across the Pacific Northwest, from Oregon to British Columbia.Wildlife Rescue is seeing record-breaking numbers of birds displaying symptoms of Salmonella infection.

Both organizations have noticed increased reports of sick and dying birds have been noted across the Pacific Northwest, from Oregon to British Columbia.Wildlife Rescue is seeing record-breaking numbers of birds displaying symptoms of Salmonella infection.

So far this month (January 2021) the BC SPCA’s Wild Animal Rehabilitation Centre has admitted 43 pine siskin birds showing signs of the disease.

If you see a sick bird you’re asked to call the BC SPCA at 1-855-622-7722 or your nearest wildlife rehabilitation centre.

Rosedale’s Vickie Legere told FVN: Please be warned this is happening in the Fraser Valley! I think I’ve had a couple of these birds – actually took a picture of one, thinking it was strange that it just sat there. Take down your feeders immediately & wash them with a bleach solution. Do not put them back up for at least 2 weeks or more This includes water sources such as bird baths and bowls. The birds will not starve as they will find food in the wild for the two weeks my feeders are down.

If you find a sick bird, it’s important that you bring it to your local wildlife rehabilitator. Sick birds need to be removed from the environment so we can stop the spread of this deadly disease. Sick birds will appear fluffed up, sleepy, and may be easily approached (may not fly away). If you come into contact with a sick bird, please WASH YOUR HANDS! Salmonella (along with lots of other illnesses) is highly transmissible to humans and our companion animals!

Video can be found here – https://fb.watch/2UAlyHxBPM/

One thought on “UPDATE – BC SPCA, BC Wildlife Rescue Say Bird Feeders Can Go Back Outside – Monitor Birds Re: Salmonella Outbreak (VIDEO)”
  1. September 11, 2021 We live in Ladner and have a large garden. This year there are very few birds and we are wondering if this is due to the salmonella outbreak earlier or some other cause. There used to be dozens of chickadees at our sunflowers. Now we see one at a time. Bird calls also seem to be far less frequent. Mornings are quiet. It has been this way for most of the summer but I feel like it is getting worse. We haven’t seen one bush tit all summer and I don’t think there have been any finches. Even the doves are calling less than normal.

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