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Provincial Funding to help Aboriginal People Affected by Violence

Victoria – The Province is investing $1.5 million to increase services and supports throughout the province for Aboriginal people who are affected by domestic violence.

Aboriginal women and children reflect a higher percentage of British Columbians who are affected by domestic violence. In fact, Aboriginal women are nearly three times more likely to be victims of intimate partner violence than non-Aboriginal women.

The $1.5-million investment will be used over the next two years to provide direct services for Aboriginal women, men, and children who experience domestic violence.

The Province will work with a partnership table of government, non-government and Aboriginal representatives to develop funding criteria, with a focus on increasing services and supports in rural and remote communities. The BC Association of Aboriginal Friendship Centres will distribute the confirmed funding – on behalf of the B.C. government – to partner agencies.

Today’s announcement supports the government’s second- and third-year commitments under the three-year, $5.5-million Provincial Domestic Violence Plan which include improving direct services for Aboriginal children, youth and families in rural and remote communities. Developed in consultation with Aboriginal communities and organizations, the plan supports culturally relevant approaches and programs for Aboriginal people who are affected by domestic violence, including survivors and perpetrators.

Quick Facts:

  • In 2013, there were 12,359 police-reported victims of intimate partner violence throughout the province. However, it is estimated that only about one in four women ever report their abuse to police.
  • The B.C. government commits more than $70 million per year in prevention and intervention services, and programs that benefit victims of domestic violence and other crimes.
  • This year, the Province invested more than $5 million in civil forfeiture grant funding to support community-led anti-violence and crime prevention initiatives, with $3.4 million devoted to projects that support the Vision for a Violence Free BC Strategy.
  • The strategy is B.C.’s long-term path to creating a province where all women have the supports they need to help prevent violence, escape from violent situations, and recover if they have been victims of violence.
  • Over $1 million in civil forfeiture grants this year were provided to fund 58 projects focused on supporting Aboriginal communities in anti-violence and prevention initiatives.
  • In 2014, over $3.6 million in civil forfeiture grants were used to support vulnerable women, and over $750,000 was allocated to crime prevention and anti-violence projects supporting Aboriginal communities.
  • The Province has committed to dedicating a portion of civil forfeiture funds in future years to support the Vision for a Violence Free BC strategy.
  • In February 2015, government helped open a newly integrated Domestic Violence Unit (DVU) in Surrey, and the new Nanaimo DVU opened in April, bringing the total number of DVUs in the province to seven.
  • The Province will provide $400,000 over the next two years to support 37 community groups as they give voice to the issue of stopping violence against Aboriginal women and girls.
  • These Giving Voice projects are designed by and for Aboriginal women and agencies to change behaviours and attitudes, and mobilize communities. The grants will support projects like:
    • A program in Nanaimo for women to share and record stories of resilience and strength in overcoming violence, including a cultural longhouse ceremony honouring young women and their unique role of creator.
    • A men’s workshop in Kelowna to teach traditional parenting skills, the role of men as protectors, and more respectful relationships.
  • Through the Off-Reserve Aboriginal Action Plan, the government continues to support the BC Aboriginal Association of Friendship Centre Moose Hide Campaign, which supports Aboriginal men as they stand up against violence against women.
  • The Provincial Domestic Violence Plan, which was co-ordinated through the Provincial Office of Domestic Violence in consultation with the public and anti-violence stakeholders, aims to make B.C. a safer place for women, children and anyone who has been affected by domestic violence.
  • The Provincial Office of Domestic Violence was created in March 2012 as the permanent lead for the B.C. government, focused on strengthening the services and supports available for children, women and families affected by domestic violence.

Learn More:

To find out more about domestic violence programs, services and supports in B.C., visit: www.saysomethingbc.ca/

To read the Provincial Domestic Violence Plan and learn more about the Provincial Office of Domestic Violence, visit: www.mcf.gov.bc.ca/podv/index.htm

To read the Vision for a Violence Free BC strategy, visit: www.pssg.gov.bc.ca/victimservices/shareddocs/pubs/violence-free-bc.pdf

For more information on additional government services and supports for Aboriginal children, youth, and their families, visit: www.mcf.gov.bc.ca/about_us/aboriginal/index.htm

For more information on the Minister’s Advisory Council on Aboriginal Women (MACAW), visit: www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/governments/aboriginal-people/minister-s-advisory-council-on-aboriginal-women-macaw

For more information about the BC Association of Aboriginal Friendship Centres: www.bcaafc.com/

BACKGROUNDER

How B.C. is addressing violence against women

Funding and resources

The B.C. government commits more than $70 million per year in prevention and intervention services and programs that benefit victims of domestic violence and other crimes. In April 2015, the Province invested a further $5 million in civil forfeiture grants for projects focused on preventing crime and ending violence against women. The Province has also committed to dedicating a portion of civil forfeiture funds in future years to support the Vision for a Violence Free BC strategy.

Provincial Office of Domestic Violence

In March 2012, the B.C. government established the Provincial Office of Domestic Violence (PODV) under the Ministry of Children and Family Development. PODV is responsible for co-ordinating and strengthening the policies, practices and services across government that support children and families who are dealing with the effects of domestic violence. Learn more about the office at: www.mcf.gov.bc.ca/podv/

Provincial Domestic Violence Plan

The three-year, $5.5-million Provincial Domestic Violence Plan, released in February 2014, includes an Aboriginal response and specific approaches to address the unique needs of immigrant and refugee women, and women with disabilities. Read the plan at: www.mcf.gov.bc.ca/podv/pdf/dv_pp_booklet.pdf. The first annual report, which outlines the key accomplishments from year one of the plan, is now posted online at: www.mcf.gov.bc.ca/podv/pdf/dv_pp_far.pdf.

Vision for a Violence Free BC

The Vision for a Violence Free BC strategy is a long-term commitment to end violence against women. The strategy is the Province’s road map, combining immediate actions with a long-term vision to end violence and support women whose lives and well-being have been affected by violence. View the strategy by visiting: www.pssg.gov.bc.ca/victimservices/shareddocs/pubs/violence-free-bc.pdf

Minister’s Advisory Council on Aboriginal Women

In 2011, the Province created the Minister’s Advisory Council on Aboriginal Women (MACAW), a partnership between Aboriginal women, organizations and leaders, to provide advice to government about how to improve the quality of life for Aboriginal women. As a result of MACAW and the strong partnerships created, the Province and First Nation leaders signed a Memorandum of Understanding committing to work together to end violence against Aboriginal women and girls in June 2014. Learn more at: www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/governments/aboriginal-people/minister-s-advisory-council-on-aboriginal-women-macaw.

#SaySomething

The Province’s social media and radio campaign – #SaySomething – launched in March 2015 and was one of the first steps in the broader strategy for a violence-free B.C. The campaign, which worked in concert with other campaigns, including Be More Than a Bystander, consisted of animated videos and information on programs, services and supports for those who need help and want to help. Learn more about how you can safely help at: saysomethingbc.ca

Be More Than a Bystander

As a founding partner (with the BC Lions, the Ending Violence Association of BC, Status of Women in Canada and the Encana Corporation), the Ministry of Children and Family Development has now provided a total of more than $1.1 million to support the award-winning Be More Than a Bystander violence prevention and awareness program. Learn more at: http://endingviolence.org/prevention-programs/be-more-than-a-bystander/

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