Ottawa/Fraser Valley (CP/National Post) —Valley dairy farmers have raised eyebrows since word spread last week about the Trans Pacific Partnership which could drastically affect their way of life.

Original Story can be found here.

Dairy farmers parked tractors at the foot of Parliament Hill, walked cows through downtown Ottawa and dumped milk on the pavement Tuesday to protest what they say is a looming trade deal that threatens their way of life.

Chilliwack City Councilor Chris Kloot, a chicken farmer was also a dairy farmer ( his brother now runs that part of the family business), had this to day to FVN Fraser Valley News : It would greatly affect the way the family farm has been running for generations. In the US for example dairy farmers are given subsidies. The small family farms will be in jeopardy, and dairy farmers will either have to go big or get out. Then the reality is there is not enough land to support huge mega factory farms. Canadian dairy farmers (and poultry) are not given subsidies, are ensured a fair return and do not flood the markets. They have invested millions of dollars into the supply management system and it’s proved it had worked. We took the risk to invest. We make the payments. Canadian dairy farms are worth fighting for. Last time I checked consumers want to know their products are local & produced in a fair and safe manner. Nothing is worth jeopardizing that.

Farmers in Ontario and Quebec fear that the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a massive 12-country trade deal that’s said to be near an agreement in principle, could spell the end of the supply management system that keeps their operations profitable.

Dozens of tractors clogged Wellington Street in front of the Parliament Buildings, snarling traffic, while some farmers led cows down the street and others splashed milk on the pavement.

Robbie Beck, a dairy farmer in Shawville, Que., brought his dairy cow Lea to the protest in Ottawa.

Sean Kilpatrick / Canadian Press
Sean Kilpatrick / Canadian Press Robbie Beck of Shawville, Que., holds onto a dairy cow as he takes part in a protest in front of Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, September 29, 2015.
 

Beck said he believes the Conservative government’s approach to supply management could ultimately cost them votes in key rural ridings — particularly in eastern Ontario and Quebec — when voters head to the polls Oct. 19.

“I’m a small-c conservative thinker, that’s probably the natural home for my vote,” Beck said.

“I’m with the Harper government on nearly everything except trade.”

Negotiations are currently underway on the ambitious trade deal involving Canada and 11 other countries. Sources say an agreement in principle could be announced as early as Friday.

Farmers fear the federal government will make concessions on supply management, a system of production limits and import tariffs that shields the dairy market from competition at the hands of foreign producers.

Sean Kilpatrick / Canadian Press
Sean Kilpatrick / Canadian Press Dairy farmers take to the streets of downtown Ottawa on Tuesday, September 29, 2015.
 

The U.S. has been pushing for Canada to loosen its system, but the federal government says the government will protect Canadian interests at the negotiating table.

“This government remains absolutely committed to making sure we preserve our system of supply management through trade negotiations,” Conservative Leader Stephen Harper said Tuesday.

Opposition parties remain concerned about how the system could be affected in TPP talks.

The NDP’s Mathieu Ravignat, who is running for re-election in the Quebec riding of Pontiac, said supply management allows for many small farms to exist in Quebec and across Canada.

“We have to be shoulder-to-shoulder with our farmers, support their livelihood,” said Ravignat, who was on hand at Tuesday’s protest.

“That’s why I’m here today.

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